Category Archives: Articles

FireFlyLine: Ideas for a Faster Garment Fit Process

I recently met Lacey Bell from Fire Fly Line through an event with Fashion Group International of Chicago. Her company offers 3D prototyping for apparel and sewn products, and I was interested to find out more, so we met for lunch so she could give me some information and a software demo.

This tool is such a compliment to the traditional pattern and sample development process. While it doesn’t eliminate the need for fabric samples completely, it’s a great way to try new things with existing patterns and get more bang for your buck. I know many of my clients could benefit from this, especially when testing design iterations such as changing fabrics (or colors), hem length, sleeve or neckline variations, etc. In essence, you can see and test samples before making cutting into different fabrics, and save some time and cost.

Read some tips for creating a faster garment fit process and how 3D prototyping can benefit you. I shared one of my tips in here too!

http://www.fireflyline.com/blog/ideas-for-a-faster-garment-fit-process

Maker’s Row: Avoid Headaches in Business

Since I work in the “background” with my clients’ brands, it’s always nice to get a shout out. Product development is very much a collaborative process, and my client Brennan Waldorf of Canvy’s Bag Company nailed that in this blog for Maker’s Row!

I worked with Brennan on his production patterns, tech packs and pre-production samples, as well as some sourcing for the appropriate thread, interlining and interfacing for his structured travel bags.

Read more: https://makersrow.com/blog/2016/01/a-bag-designers-insight-3-ways-to-avoid-headaches-in-business/

Check out Canvy’s website here: www.canvysbagco.com/

Stay tuned for their upcoming Kickstarter campaign!

Fashion and Fabric Technology

Technology has obviously influenced our lives and fashion in many ways. But besides actual gadgets, how else is technology incorporated into clothing and textiles?

In this article from Business of Fashion, fashion technologist, Dr. Amanda Parkes is interviewed on the subject of wearable technology:

http://www.businessoffashion.com/2014/11/amanda-parkes-wearable-tech-gadgets.html

Wearable fiber technologies include many properties: waterproof, glow-in-the-dark, odor resistance, anti-microbial, temperature control and temperature sensitive or reactive materials. Some of these are not new, but I mention them as they go along with this expanding field of fiber technology. Many active wear and performance companies are using these types of materials in their products already.

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Thermo-reactive doesn’t need to  bring back memories of hypercolor:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/why-hypercolor-t-shirts-were-just-a-one-hit-wonder-3353436/?no-ist

Now, companies like Sommers Plastics and HSD Zipper have modern thermo-chromatic technologies available.

Columbia Sportswear has the patented Omni-Heat Reflective technology built into many of their outerwear coats, shoes and accessories, which reacts to your body’s heat and reflects it back to you, keeping you warmer in the cold.

http://www.columbia.com/technology-omniheatreflective/

http://gearjunkie.com/columbia-turbodown-insulation-jacket

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Combining water proofing with breathable material in one fabric? Check out materials from AKAS Textiles and Kendor.

 

 

Textile shows are a great way to find out about the latest and greatest materials and technologies that companies are making. This month, TexWorld USA will be in New York January 19-21. For more information, visit their website.

Made in America – Gaining Popularity

I have always thought that having clothing and other products made in America was an important issue. We as a country have long been outsourcing jobs and importing goods, and apparel and sewn products make up a huge amount of those imported goods. A recent poll by Adweek Media/Harris Poll showed that 61% of Americans are more likely to purchase a product if it is “Made in America.” Only 3% would be less likely to purchase.

The study goes on to show slight differences in results between different areas of the country. Midwesterners are most likely to purchase American-made products, with 67% of respondents agreeing with that statement. Though other areas of the country had slightly lower results, all had 57% or more who agreed. Surveyed by age, older consumers, those over age 55, are most likely to purchase products made in the USA. 75% of those in that age group agreed. Younger Americans, those 18-34, were only 44% more likely to purchase products made in the USA, though 52% said they were neither more or less influenced to purchase by country of origin.

The full article can be found here at MarketingCharts.com.

Regardless of your personal patriotism, I think it’s important to support the American worker. Products made here are basically guaranteed to not be made using child-labor, substandard or unsafe working conditions, and to pay their employees a fair wage. You can’t regulate a factory overseas as easily or effectively.