Category Archives: Links

Recap: Fashion Focus Chicago & Fashion Town Hall

This recap is a few weeks behind, but I wanted to share my experience at Fashion Focus Chicago 2014. The week started on October 14th with the Fashion Town Hall kick off event at the Chitownhallphotocago Cultural Center. The program, headed by Mayor’s Fashion Council director, Tonya Gross, featured speakers from the various fashion organizations, including AIBI and Fashion Group International, the Macy’s Fashion Incubator program, and all of the local colleges with fashion design programs.

One of the interesting organizations I learned about was HIVE Chicago, which networks high school students with local designers and companies for internship and learning opportunities. I also found out that the SAIC’s fashion resource center is open to the public, I will definitely need to make time to check that collection out!

The presentation highlighted some great companies and designers here in Chicago, including Shernett Swaby, Lagi Nadaeu, Oxford Clothing and Optimo Hats.

swaby  laginadaeu   oxford optimo

Nena Ivon gave the keynote address, and was very interesting to listen to. She’s a current instructor at Columbia College, and has an extensive background in fashion from working as a the marketing director for Saks Fifth Avenue. She gave advice to designers about promoting themselves, and the importance of wearing your own products (or bringing a model with you to events if you design for another market):

“I’ve one of one, I’ve never been one of many.”

“Who knows you better and your product better than you do?”

She also pointed to some figures that show that the Midwest will become the hub for the country by 2025 (let’s see!)

Following the program, emcee Ryan M. Beshel led a panel discussion with some industry figures including Nena Ivon, Maria Anderson (of Agency Galatea), Diana Michelle and Jivesh Toor from J. Toor (honored in September by FGI as Rising Stars in Menswear), Lagi Nadeau (honored by FGI as Rising Star in Women’s Apparel), and Jonathon Smith of StyleChicago.com.

fashiontownhallpanel

Some take-ways from the discussion (paraphrased):

Ryan M. Beshel: Take your blinders off and look outside of the city, and country for inspiration.

Jonathon Smith: Figure out the business side of fashion before doing runway shows. Take advantage of mentorship expereiences.

Nena Ivon: Listen to honest feedback, it’s not personal. 

Diana Michelle: Know yourself and how to communicate and define your personal brand. Also, maintain relationships and figure out who do you want to do business with.

And some exciting news, the Chicago Fashion Resources listings are back!

resources

Made in America – Gaining Popularity

I have always thought that having clothing and other products made in America was an important issue. We as a country have long been outsourcing jobs and importing goods, and apparel and sewn products make up a huge amount of those imported goods. A recent poll by Adweek Media/Harris Poll showed that 61% of Americans are more likely to purchase a product if it is “Made in America.” Only 3% would be less likely to purchase.

The study goes on to show slight differences in results between different areas of the country. Midwesterners are most likely to purchase American-made products, with 67% of respondents agreeing with that statement. Though other areas of the country had slightly lower results, all had 57% or more who agreed. Surveyed by age, older consumers, those over age 55, are most likely to purchase products made in the USA. 75% of those in that age group agreed. Younger Americans, those 18-34, were only 44% more likely to purchase products made in the USA, though 52% said they were neither more or less influenced to purchase by country of origin.

The full article can be found here at MarketingCharts.com.

Regardless of your personal patriotism, I think it’s important to support the American worker. Products made here are basically guaranteed to not be made using child-labor, substandard or unsafe working conditions, and to pay their employees a fair wage. You can’t regulate a factory overseas as easily or effectively.